Quick! Explain “Microservices”

Recently Martin Fowler (a well-known co-author of the Agile Manifesto) wrote an in-depth and very lucid explanation of Microservices, along with co-author James Lewis. With new technologies, new fads, and new twists on old terminology popping up every month, it can be hard to weed out just another buzzword from something tangible.

Fowler’s definition is, in short, that Microservices are “an approach to developing a single application as a suite of small services, each running in its own process and communicating with lightweight mechanisms, often an HTTP resource API.”

So what does that mean? Isn’t any program, ultimately, a bunch of small services working together? Here’s a quick synopsis for the TL;DR types:

  1. Microservice architectures embody small, independently deployable services (usually business functions). Such functions tend to have a small scope, and can sustain themselves. They don’t need a big, monolithic application framework — they are “small services.”
  2. Such services are independently scalable. In other words, you don’t have to invest a huge amount of resource scaling your entire application — instead, you can focus on making only those “important or difficult” services scalable.
  3. They provide explicit (component) interfaces. This means that each small service provides a clean, usable API. This tends to promote excellent encapsulation and also stability across a suite of services.
  4. This same attribute (explicit interfaces) also promotes segmented development. Since each service is, by definition, independent and each offers a stable API, each can be built and maintained on its own.
  5. Change cycles tend to accelerate, again because each service is independent. Since each service stands on its own, a single service can be changed, tested, and redeployed without a monolithic build/test/fix/deploy cycle.
  6. This architecture also tends to lead to robustness. Since each service is independent, networks of services tend to test for, isolate, and handle failure gracefully. In other words, since there is no single monolithic system, trust is low. Services tend to anticipate and handle failure well.

Microservices tend to be very agile-friendly, too — leading to the question, which was first, the microservice or agile (it was probably agile). The point is, since services can be quickly iterated, we can make small changes more easily. And as Martin Fowler points out, we also benefit from great architectural flexibility:

Splitting the monolith’s components out into services we have a choice when building each of them. You want to use Node.js to standup a simple reports page? Go for it. C++ for a particularly gnarly near-real-time component? Fine. You want to swap in a different flavour of database that better suits the read behaviour of one component? We have the technology to rebuild him.

 

For a more in-depth explanation of Microservices, I’d recommend reading Fowler’s article.

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