Inspiring Innovation Across Global Teams

Hi, I’m Zacharias Beckman, president of Hyrax International. There are a lot of misconceptions about innovation, and what we can expect from our global teams when it comes to innovation. Here’s an example.

Jason has a technology company here in the U.S., and they’ve just expanded into Asia. Jason expected that the new team would integrate quickly, and start contributing. By adding another 8 hour shift to the day, he expected his firm to see a dramatic increase in output.

Instead, a few months in, the Asian team seemed to be underperforming. His U.S. managers complained that the new team didn’t produce new ideas. They weren’t even improving on existing ideas. Basically, they were doing what they were told… and if they didn’t have really clear instructions, they kind of did nothing.

What Jason and his management team didn’t realize is that it wasn’t a performance or motivation issue. The problem was with business culture.

Jason’s new Asian employees had been trained for task-based execution. It’s what they knew, all the way from their educational experience, to their most recent employment. The team was not accustomed to critical thinking, and the business culture didn’t support challenging authority. To make matters worse, the Western and Eastern teams weren’t communicating well. With the U.S. team’s low context communication style, they missed a lot of high context cues from their Asian counterparts. The high context communication, to the Western team, was just too subtle — and, it didn’t really come through on a conference, call anyhow.

With all this going on, the new team was set up to fail. They did not expect to be driving innovation. They expected to be told what to execute, and do an excellent job at it.

The unexpected cultural differences demanded a lot of changes in Jason’s strategy. He had to change his immediate goals for both teams, and change what the Asian team was working on. In the longer term, he had to launch a strategy that would get everyone to the same place. That meant a lot of cross cultural training and changes to their very Western, U.S. management style, and taking a much more mature, global approach to the business. Jason learned the hard way how critical it is to understand your partner’s business culture before engaging in business.

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