Where In The World…?

Have you ever wondered what makes the Global economy work? How your country makes most of it’s money? Or perhaps where people are migrating on a global scale? What language to speak in the U.S. if you don’t speak English? Here are some fantastic interactive maps and graphs to give us answers to a few of our Global questions.

What Does Your Country Export?

Do you know which export makes your country the most money? Using data from the CIA Factbook, the Global Post labeled every country in the world by its highest valued export (meaning, the commodity that makes the country the most money in the global market).

It’s probably not a surprise to learn that much of the world run’s on oil, and that Europe is where most machinery and automobiles are made (perhaps because of modernization but, also, a wonderfully centralized location). Take a look at the Global Post’s original article for a fully interactive map.

World Commodities Map
World Commodities Map: What is your country’s major export?

The Global Flow Of People

Did you know that from 1990 to 1995, about 366,000 people moved from Thailand to America — but only 72,000 did so between 2005 and 2010? Or that in the early 1990’s, most of the roughly 7 million people migrating around # moved between Pakistan, Iran, and Afghanistan — but that after 2005, that changed dramatically as people started to spread across India, Asia, North America, and Europe?

It’s fascinating to see how people migrate around the world, and even more interesting to wonder what motivates these changes in global flows of people. Thanks to Nikola Sander, Guy J. Abel & Ramon Bauer, we now have a fantastic interactive map to explore. Their Global Migration Flows Map was published in Science recently.

Global Migration Flows Map
Global Migration Flows Map

12 Charts To Make An American’s Blood Boil

Thanks to the article Overworked America: 12 Charts That Will Make Your Blood Boil, published by Mother Jones, we now know that while the U.S. economy has grown by about 60%, and corporate profits are up by about 20%, the American worker is not so lucky. “Productivity has surged, but income and wages have stagnated for most Americans. If the median household income had kept pace with the economy since 1970, it would now be nearly $92,000, not $50,000,” writes Dave Gilson.

Take a look at Gilson’s article, which features a dozen interesting (and infuriating, if you happen to be American) graphs such as the following one, which shows how the “top 1%” wage rates have skyrocketed in the past decade, and productivity has been steadily pushed upward, but overall wage averages remain stagnant.

US Wage Gains
US Wage and Productivity Gains, 1979 to 2009

Most Common Language Other Than English

Finally, Ben Blatt at Slate brings us the definitive answer to the question: “In the U.S., what’s the most common language spoken besides English?” He breaks it down by State, which makes it all the more interesting. I would certainly have expected some diversity, given his research and source. “One of the most interesting data sets for aspiring mapmakers is the Census Bureau’sAmerican Community Survey. Among other things, that survey includes a detailed look at the languages spoken in American homes,” writes Blatt.

His first pass was revealing. The answer is Spanish, at least in all but a few of the 50 United States. In retrospect, perhaps this shouldn’t be surprising, but it did drive Blatt to take another pass, excluding both Spanish and English. Visit his original article for a more thorough breakdown.

Languages By State
The Most Widely Spoken Language in the U.S. Other Than English

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