Should I Translate My Business Card?

Exchanging business cards (or “name cards” as they are called in China) is an important ritual throughout the business world. The business card is part of your introduction and, in many cultures, it’s unforgivable if you don’t have a professional card. But in an increasingly Global business world, there are linguistic and cultural considerations too… So should you translate your card, and if so, how many times?

Hi, I am Zacharias Beckman, President of Hyrax International. I recently had a client ask me if they should translate their business card into another language, for the clients they are working with around the world. This really depends on what kind of a business you are in, for one thing. Let’s say, for example, you are a U.S. based importer bringing products into the U.S. from around the world. You probably wouldn’t need to translate your card in this case because for one thing, your suppliers are going to expect to doing business with you in English. But, on the other hand, translating your card into many different languages, for every country you do business with, would probably be impractical.

Now, another possibility is, let’s say you are a language translation company and it’s important that you demonstrate competence and ability in certain languages. In this case you probably would want to translate your card, or at least some part of your card, to indicate that you support all these different languages in your translation service.

Reputation also matters. Having a U.S. based business does bring a certain degree of credibility to you. So, translating in English card into other languages isn’t always necessary. Sometimes leaving it in English is actually the right choice. We actually have had our clients tell us that we should just leave our card in English, because it provides a certain amount of credibility.

But probably the most important deciding factor is going to be whether or not language is a barrier. For example, if you’re doing a lot of business in China, with people who predominantly speak Mandarin, you should definitely translate the back side of your card into Mandarin. On the other hand, if you’re working in India, this strategy is unnecessary. Almost every professional is going to speak English and they are probably going to give you an English card, anyhow. Different countries have different rules. In Africa, for instance, you’ll be fine with English cards. But, if you’re going into South America, most likely you should have a Spanish translation because Spanish is widely used in business throughout South America.

Whatever you decide, be practical. I recently met somebody who had not less than five different business cards stuffed into his wallet, and it took him about thirty seconds to find the right one to give me. And it was a very awkward moment. If you work predominantly with one country, then consider translating your card so that you have your native language on the front and a foreign language at the back and leave it at that. On the other hand, if you work with many different countries, then you might want to consider translating your tagline or perhaps your company slogan, and you can do that with a couple of different languages. That will indicate your support of different languages without having five different cards stuffed into your wallet.

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