Dealing With Timezone Differences

Working in the global economy means spending lots of time connecting with clients and colleagues on the other side of the world. But multinational teams also face “multi-timezone” management problems. What seems like an obvious, potential problem can cause management nightmares for multinational leaders. Here are few tips on how to deal with time zone differences and build smoothly functioning, multinational teams.

Hi, I am Zacharias Beckman, president of Hyrax International, and today I want to talk about dealing with timezone differences. In my work, I’m frequently fixing problems with projects that have gone off the rails. That often means a lot of travel — going to international partners, finding out what’s wrong and fixing it. And when I’m traveling, then — that means being able to collaborate with my team, back here in the United States, is also a problem.

Timezone Challenges For Teams

Focus on finding a method for seamless communication, throughout your entire company, worldwide. You want your teams to break down barriers. You don’t want a team here to be thinking “Oh, I just cant call the other team because they are in different time zone, they’re half way around the world and I can’t bother them.” You do want them to pick up the phone and call or use Skype or whatever it is. The teams need to get to know each other. One way to do that is through co-location. Bring the foreign team home for a while. Or, send some of your team members there, so that you can build a tighter relationship.

But when co-location isn’t an option, you can turn to frequent short meetings — by phone, by Skype, it doesn’t matter. It’s the frequent contact that helps. It breaks down barriers so that the teams starts to operate as a single team, not as a bunch of different team separated by distance and culture. You don’t want your teams to feel distant, because then they are going to act distant.

The other thing you want to do is work on implementing collaboration tools that work really well with remotely located teams. So, project management systems that are easy to access, information radiators and easy to use communication tools. Plan your work days to overlap a little bit. It wont do to have your team in India working from 10 to 6pm and your team in the United States working from 9 to 5 because there is no overlap, there’s no communication. Instead adjust schedules a little bit on each side and try to have about an hour or so of overlap, so that your team can then have a daily or semi-daily stand up meeting. The idea is just to get everyone on the phone and in the virtual room together, so that they can find out what happened on the other side of the world and the they can ask the other team for what they need in order to move forward. The frequent contact and the direct connection is going to go a long way towards breaking down barriers between the team and making them more efficient.

But the meetings are short. They are just to touch base. They’re there for one team to let the other one know what happened and what they need so that they can move on and make progress, the next day.

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