Do hackers make the best testers?

Recently, I was asked “what makes a good software tester,” and as a subtext, whether hacking and testing share a similar mindset, and how wide a skill set testers need to have.

I think the most valuable asset a Software Tester can have is an attitude of gleeful problem discovery. Someone that loves to break systems, discover their imperfections, and explore their weaknesses makes a great tester. I haven’t met many people that really enjoy and excel at this, but it’s probably is an attribute that is common with Hackers as well.

It’s also wonderful to have a tester that really cares about the quality of the product. It’s absolutely essential for someone that wants to excel as a tester. That means having the patience and desire to work closely with the Quality Assurance group, to understand what a “good customer experience” means, and to really grasp things like quality of services, user experience, and customer needs.

Part of being a good tester means enjoying running down the rabbit hole. Where the hole leads is a mystery. Perhaps testing discovers problems stemming from poor UI design, SQL injection problems, performance issues caused by heavy loading, or playing the clueless user that always clicks the wrong thing and triggers a logic error.

The “how” of testing is another matter though. Yes, there are well understood principles and techniques, and often tools, for testing all of these things. I have found that in most cases, good testers tend to specialize. I don’t expect to find one person that can find the flaws in the user interface, perform load testing, and also look for SQL injection vulnerabilities. To get really good at all of these things, you need a team — some of those team members will focus on the back end, some on security, some on database systems, some on the front end. Finding someone that’s great at tackling a couple of those verticals is pretty rare. That said, every tester should have an adequate, at least shallow understanding of all of these areas. In order to properly localize a problem, you need to understand what could be causing it. But having other resources to bring in to help diagnose the specialty areas is critical.

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